Puma runs away from leather in pursuit of smaller footprint

Source: Greenbiz Puma may soon be waving goodbye to leather. Executive chairman Jochen Zeitz recently said that the company will soon have to give up using the material in its athletic shoes because of the ecological damage it does to the planet. Zeitz said in an interview with the Financial Times that Puma will “eventually” have to study possible leather alternative materials. Zeitz said in the interview that the production and processing of leather are the biggest contributors to Puma’s environmental footprint. “We have to find alternative ways of producing our raw materials without asking nature to do it for us,” the Financial Times quoted Zeitz as saying. The German-based company’s recent announcement is just the latest sign that the sports footwear industry is searching for ways to cut its leather dependency. Shoemakers have long offered alternatives to leather footwear. But only recently has the trend hit the sports market. “Leather is really old school,” said Matt Powell, chief retail analyst with SportsOneSource. “It’s heavy, it doesn’t breathe well, and it isn’t always consistent.” While sustainability is a big …

Australia introduces controversial carbon tax

Source: bbc.co.uk The law forces about 300 of the worst-polluting firms to pay a A$23 (£15; $24) levy for every tonne of greenhouse gases they produce. The government says the tax is needed to meet climate-change obligations of Australia – the highest emitter per-head in the developed world. But the opposition calls it a “toxic tax” that will cost jobs. The opposition also argues that the tax will raise the cost of living, promising to repeal the legislation if it wins the next election, due in 2013. Environmentalists have broadly backed the scheme, but there have been large public protests against it. ‘Realistic way’ Australia’s mining firms, airlines, steel makers and energy firms are among those expected to be hardest hit by the the Clean Energy Act. Domestic fuel bills are expected to rise as companies pass on the costs to consumers. But the Labor government of Prime Minister Julia Gillard says it is the only realistic way of meeting Australia’s climate-change obligations. It says the that low income earners will …

Banaras Hindu University scientists achieve success in removing sulphur from coal

Source: Timesofindia VARANASI: After achieving success in obtaining clean fuel (coal) through eco-friendly clean coal technology, a team of scientists from Banaras Hindu University has achieved another milestone by removing sulphur from coal with the help of bacterial consortia. The team comprising of Prof MP Singh, department of Geology and scientist couple Dr PK Singh, associate professor, Geology and his wife Dr Asha Lata Singh, assistant professor, Environmental Science have successfully isolated bacteria from coal and have used its consortia to remove environmentally sensitive and toxic sulphur, which is present in Himalayan coal across the country. The research paper based on this work has been accepted for publication in ‘Energy Exploration and Exploitation’, which is a reputed journal of England this year. “This work is first of its kind in the country, where the bacteria has been isolated from the coal and its consortia has been used to remove sulphur, which is a major environmental pollutant. We isolated the bacteria from sulphur rich coal and scientifically carried out its mass cultivation and …

Why Toyota is Top Global Green Brand of 2012

Source: Triplepundit Interbrand, one of the world’s leading brand consulting firms, released its 2012 Best Global Green Brands Report.Toyota (#1), Johnson & Johnson (#2) and Honda (#3) top the ranking with Danone (#9), Ford (#15), Starbucks (#36) and UPS (#43) representing this year’s top risers. To make the top 50 Best Global Green Brands, organizations must perform well in two areas: sustainability performance and sustainability perception. Interbrand examines how a brand’s sustainability efforts are perceived by consumers. Each brand’s performance score is based on 82 individual sub-metrics across six key elements: governance, stakeholder engagement, operations, supply chain, transportation and logistics, and products and services. Each brand’s perception score is determined through a consumer study covering 10,000 respondents; 1,000 in each of the ten largest economies, including the US, Japan, China, Germany, France, United Kingdom, Italy, Brazil, India and Canada. Each brand is assessed by 1,250 consumers using Interbrand’s six external brand strength pillars: authenticity, relevance, differentiation, consistency, presence and understanding. The Best Global Green Brand report’s overall scores are calculated by combining the …

Seeing Through the Fog

Source: BCG Perspectives A Practical Guide for Dealing with Carbon In San Francisco in the summer, fog rolls across the bay at certain hours of the afternoon, swiftly enveloping the city in a dense cover. In many ways, U.S. carbon rules are just like that blanket of fog: inevitable but of uncertain timing, all-encompassing, and with a sudden and large impact on life and the environment. Carbon rules will have massive direct economic impacts on most industries, but particularly on emitters such as companies in the power, oil and gas, metals, cement, paper, and mining industries. These impacts will be pervasive for most emitting and nonemitting companies and will have implications for major functions and management processes, as well as for market structures and relative competitive positions. Investors and analysts are increasingly sensitive to carbon issues and are looking to management teams to craft a response, despite the uncertainty over the rules’ nature and timing. Surprisingly, little of the relevant literature has addressed in a pragmatic manner what companies should do …

Effective World Government Will Be Needed to Stave Off Climate Catastrophe

Source: The Scientific American Almost six years ago, I was the editor of a single-topic issue on energy for Scientific American that included an article by Princeton University’s Robert Socolow that set out a well-reasoned plan for how to keep atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations below a planet-livable threshold of 560 ppm. The issue came replete with technical solutions that ranged from a hydrogen economy to space-based solar. If I had it to do over, I’d approach the issue planning differently, my fellow editors permitting. I would scale back on the nuclear fusion and clean coal, instead devoting at least half of the available space for feature articles on psychology, sociology, economics and political science. Since doing that issue, I’ve come to the conclusion that the technical details are the easy part. It’s the social engineering that’s the killer. Moon shots and Manhattan Projects are child’s play compared to needed changes in the way we behave. A policy article authored by several dozen scientists appeared online March 15 in Science to …

What’s Your Company’s Water Footprint?

Source : Harvard Business Review Last year we heard a chorus of “water is the new oil,” including a memorable BusinessWeek cover depicting oil baron T. Boone Pickens knee-deep in H20. This year the cry is “water is the new carbon” in response to a heightened awareness that resources such as water are more critical and valuable to a company’s operation (and brand value) than previously assumed. If you are a water-intensive business such as the food and beverage sector, water is now at the top of your list of sustainability issues to address. Yes, water is a key business risk that needs to be managed just as energy and carbon are now managed. But in fact, water is not the new oil or the new carbon, and neither comparison is a constructive way to view the value and risk of water within a business context. Water presents several unique challenges: it is not actually “used,” but simply “borrowed” (water is used and discharged returning it to the hydrologic cycle for potential …

One Child One Light Diwali Campaign

We have launched our campaign to gift a smile to children this Diwali. EfficientCarbon is partnering with Thrive Energy in its campaign of ‘One Child One Light’ and we want to make it a huge success. From our side, we would be making a small contribution to the campaign ourselves but we want you to support us in huge numbers. This would be run from 25/10/2010 to 05/11/2010 and organise a small event to distribute the LED study lights to the school children in villages primarily. The plan is very simple: We are sending out an open invitation to all our friends, associates and acquaintances to donate at least a single light to this campaign. We will collect the information and the donations from all of you and procure the LED study lights from Thrive Energy. We’ll select a few deserving schools in villages (or probably you could suggest us a few schools/NGO’s as well) and host a small event to distribute these lights on 07/11/2010. This will be an open event …

Clean Development Mechanism Explained

We keep hearing about jargon like The Kyoto Protocol, Clean Development Mechanism, Carbon Credits, Carbon Trading, etc., and always look for clarity on what these terms mean for the business community, countries like India or just a world citizen like us. We’ve just tried to give a perspective on what Carbon Trading / Clean Development Mechanism means and the process of getting Carbon Credits through this basic presentation. Do have a look at this, ask questions, let us know your thoughts and start a debate. We’d be happy to discuss. Clean development mechanism basics View more presentations from EfficientCarbon.

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