Generation Based Incentive for Wind Power being reinstated by Government of India

In the budget of 2013-14, Finance Minister P. Chidambaram had promised reinstating the Generation Based Incentive program for Wind Energy in India. The resolution to that effect has been finally passed by the cabinet which met on August 1st. The quick summary of the resolution that has been passed and the benefits to wind industry: Generation Based Incentive (GBI) of 50 paise per kWh (unit) generated by Wind Power. The GBI will be given till a maximum of Rs. 1 crore per MW. That means 20 million units of energy per MW can claim GBI during the entire lifetime of the wind turbine. The claim period for the GBI is between 4 years to 11 years. ie., the developer can claim the entire GBI money of Rs. 1 crore in not less than 4 years and not more than 11 years. The GBI subsidy can be availed with retrospective effect. No confirmation has been provided on reinstating the Accelerated Depreciation. This ruling is significant since it  brings back much needed …

State of Sustainability Reporting in India

India, even with it’s moderate growth over the last 2 years is one of the fastest growing economies in the world. It stands 10th in the world by GDP third in terms of PPP among the world. Even when the US, EU, Japan and other large G8+5 countries have seen stagnant or low growth rates, only China and India have managed a steady growth of 7.8% &  5.4% respectively. With growth comes pressure on resources, social inclusion and environmental stability. Both India and China are continually facing issues such as inequality, poverty, environmental pollution, corruption, public health and the like. With the line between public responsibility and private initiative blurring, the popular opinion is putting pressure on private players to be responsible in their activities, go beyond financial performance and contribute positively to the social, economic and environmental well-being of the nation and society at large. In short,  companies are under pressure to become more Sustainable. While most of the companies have been able to heed this call, a lot …

Solar Policies for Rooftop projects in India

Energy consumption in our developing nation is soaring and we are facing severe electricity shortages in several cities and towns. Conventional energy sources are already making a serious environmental impact. So to have an ecologically sustainable growth and to overcome energy security challenges, we have to turn to clean and renewable energies –like solar. It takes approximately 4.5-5 acres to set up a 1 MW solar PV (photovoltaic) generation plant. Although India is quite vast, given our population density, the per capita land availability is low. Exclusive dedication of such large tracts of land for installation of solar arrays will come at the cost of forsaking other necessities that require land. So the best suitable long term design solution for India would be a highly distributed set of individual rooftop power generation systems connected through a local grid. The rooftop power plants offer several other advantages including: -          Decrease in Transmission and Distribution (T&D) losses -          Low gestation time -          Improvement of tail-end grid voltages   The current cost of setting …

Every house in every village of India will be provided electricity by 2017: PM

Source: Newstrackindia.com The Prime Minister, Dr. Manmohan Singh, on Wednesday said that his government would initiate measures to ensure that every house in every village of India would be provided with electricity in the next five years i.e. 2017. Addressing the nation on the occasion of the country’s 65th Independence Day from the ramparts of the historic 17th century-built Red Fort, Dr. Singh said: “When the UPA Government came to power in 2004, we had promised that we would provide electricity to all villages. To fulfill this promise, we launched the Rajiv Gandhi Rural Electrification Scheme. More than one lakh new villages have been provided with electricity connections under this scheme and now almost all the villages in the country have been electrified.” “Our next target is to provide electricity to each and every household in our country in the next 5 years and to also improve the supply of electricity,” he added. India currently suffers from a major shortage of electricity generation capacity, even though it is the world’s fourth largestenergy consumer after United …

It’s Time for India to Get Serious about Solar

Source: environmentalleader.com Six hundred million people without power – and those were the ones expecting to have power. I’m not going to join the chorus of critical voices reacting to two of the world’s largest power black-outs recently in India. While surely there is ample blame to go around, it’s not really clear what happened. It could have been the lack of infrastructure investment, the light monsoon weather causing farmers to use more electricity for pumping irrigation water or states taking more than their allotted share of electricity from the grid. But one thing is clear, this power outage ground India’s economy to a halt, left 10 percent of the world’s population without power and rolled through 22 of India’s 28 states. And that’s not counting the 300 million people there who have no regular access to electricity. The electricity crisis will certainly bring India’s energy problem into the forefront so this a great time to rethink and recommit to solar being a larger part of the energy mix. Although the …

States with natural resources more economically sustainable: IFMR Study

Source: Business Standard States with abundant natural resources and less economic activity are environmentally most sustainable in India, while it is just the opposite in the case of those with high intensity of economic activities, according to the Institute for Financial Management and Research (IFMR) here. The Environmental Sustainability Index (ESI) for Indian States 2011, a study by the Centre for Development Finance under the 1970-founded IFMR, notes that the index for two years — 2009 and 2011 — shared this common characteristic. As per ESI 2010, the states that are most sustainable, which lie in the top 20 percentile, are largely Himalayan. These include Arunachal Pradesh, Manipur, Mizoram, Nagaland and Sikkim besides Himachal Pradesh. On the other hand, the least sustainable states (in the bottom 20 percentile) are Bihar, Haryana, Gujarat, Punjab, Rajasthan and Uttar Pradesh.   Even as the states with rich natural resources, like forests, are in the top category of sustainability, states that are rich in other resources like minerals, such as Chhattisgarh and Odisha, Jharkhand, Madhya Pradesh …

India to pump in Rs 2 lakh cr in 12th Plan to save climate

Source: Economic Times The fight against climate change will take a strategic jump in the 12th Five-Year Plan (2012-2017) with the government intending to plough in almost Rs 2 lakh crore through the various missions, the working group on climate of the 12th Five-Year Plan has said. The report seeks setting up of a dedicated structure of governance to oversee the different programmes under the 12th Plan with such large funds to be invested. The agriculture mission under the National Action Plan on Climate Change alone is to spend upwards of Rs 1 lakh crore over five years to make the primary sector more resilient to inevitable changes in climate change. The report pointed out that the government already spends 2.8% of its GDP on programmes that bring adaptation benefits to people. But the expert group, headed by K Kasturirangan, which wrote the report, has warned that government should not make any further commitments on reducing greenhouse gas emissions without holding the widest possible consultations with ministries concerned and other stakeholders. It …

Energy efficiency norms for ACs would save up to Rs 1,000 cr: BEE

Source: The Hindu BusinessLine NEW DELHI, MAY 2: The energy efficiency regulations for air conditioners unveiled by BEE would lead to savings of up to Rs 1,000 crore by December, 2013, a top official said on Wednesday. Bureau of Energy Efficiency (BEE), the statutory body for implementing energy efficiency standards in the country, has upgraded the energy efficiency standards by about 8 per cent of the split air-conditioners from January 1. “These standards would save us 200 MW of additional power generation capacity or savings of about Rs 1,000 crore by December 2013,” BEE Director-General, Mr Ajay Mathur, told reporters here. The cost of generating one megawatt of coal-based power is about Rs 5 crore. BEE in collaboration with Emerson Climate Technologies today launched a mobile-phone based application called “AC Power Saver” that enables consumers to calculate energy consumption and savings right on their mobile devices.

How India is creating the next big solar market

Source: GreenBiz.com With nations around the world vying for clean energy leadership, India has taken a bold step toward becoming a leader in solar development. In only two years under India’s ambitious national solar policies, prices for solar energy in India have dropped dramatically, approaching the price of traditional energy from fossil fuels. While the Indian government has a long way to go to reach its goals of 20 gigawatts of solar energy by 2022, India’s experience is a strong example of how national and state policies can unleash the potential of clean energy. Just last week, NRDC and our partner, the New Delhi-based Council on Energy, Environment and Water (CEEW), released a new report showing how — in just two years — India’s National Solar Mission has transformed the solar market in India. The report, Laying the Foundation for a Bright Future, is the first independent, external analysis that’s been done on the strengths and hurdles faced by India’s solar efforts. India’s solar numbers are nothing short of impressive: Under the first phase …

Grand distraction called river interlinking

Source: Down to Earth Last fortnight, the Supreme Court issued a diktat to the government to implement the scheme to interlink rivers. The directions are straightforward. The government shall set up a high level committee of ministers and other representatives on interlinking of rivers; the committee shall meet “at least, once in two months”; in the absence of any member the meeting shall not be adjourned; the committee shall submit a biannual report on actions to the Union Cabinet, “which shall take final and appropriate decisions in the interest of the country as expeditiously as possible and preferably within 30 days from the matter being placed before it for consideration.” Without getting into the obvious matter of judicial overreach, let us take a careful look at what interlinking is all about and what the decision will imply. The fact is that transfer of water from one river basin to another is not, per se, either a novel or an untested idea. Every irrigation project involves such transfer at some scale. …

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