Developers try to protect Solar Power businesses against Anti-Dumping duty

(Source: The Hindu – Business Line) Solar power developers in the country have united to devise a strategy to counter any anti-dumping duty on solar cells and panels imported from China and the US. (Anti-dumping investigations were notified by the Ministry of Commerce on November 28.) With only 40 days to submit a reply, 12 solar power developers participated in a conference call on Friday to discuss means to thwart any anti-dumping duty. Developers decided to activate the dormant Solar Independent Power Producers’ Association, for effective lobbying. They will also hire a consultant to generate data to back the Association’s case, and a law firm to argue the case. Read more..

Andhra Pradesh Solar Power Policy: Amendments and Clarifications

On 16th November, 2012, Government of Andhra Pradesh issued G.O. Ms. No.44 providing amendments and changes to the Andhra Pradesh Solar Power Policy issued by it on 26th September, 2012 through G.O. Ms. No.39. The following are the amendments as per the order: State will promote Solar Power developers to setup Solar Power plants for captive use or sale of power to 3rd party/State within the state only. V.A.T refund will be done for payments made in the state of Andhra Pradesh only. Irrespective of voltage level, Open Access Clearance shall be provided to both generator and consumer for 25 years or life of the project (whichever is earlier) within 15 working days of application provided that the energy transaction (between generator and consumer) is Intra-State. Banking of 100% energy will be permitted for a period of 1 year from the date of banking subject to the condition that the banked energy cannot be redeemed between February-June and TOD hours as provided from time to time. The incentives mentioned in …

Increasing size of Wind Turbines

Wind Energy is the oldest and is among the most widely used Renewable Energy sources in the world. In India, it is only next to Large Hydro in terms of capacity and energy generation. Of-late, plans to make bigger and bigger wind-turbines are being announced by companies that have been operating for decades in this field. By bigger, I mean both size-wise and capacity-wise. Siemens which announced its flagship product SWT-6.0-154 that has a 6 MW output capacity and a rotor diameter of 154m was outdone by Vestas’ V164 turbine which is not only bigger in size (80m blade and 164m rotor diameter) but is also said to produce 7 MW output. Enercon, however, already has its E-126 wind turbine on production and has finished several installations since 2007. Released as a 6 MW turbine, it was later upgraded to 7.5 MW after technical revisions. This is by far the biggest wind turbine till date. (Image Source: Vestas.com) Vestas which was working on its 7 MW turbine recently announced that, owing to …

AP Solar Power Policy – The Challenges

On 26 September 2012, Government of Andhra Pradesh announced its Solar Power Policy. This has been specifically done keeping in mind the acute power shortage in the state that has resulted in 3 days/week power holidays for industries and brought back the peak summer power cuts for households. The policy is one of the most progressive solar policies in the country as it promises several benefits to Solar Power developers. Some of these benefits include: – No wheeling/transmission charges for sale of solar power within the state – Cross Subsidy Surcharge (CSS) waived off for third-party sale of solar power within the state – Electricity Duty exemption for captive consumption and third party sale within the state – VAT on inputs for solar power projects to be refunded by the Commercial Tax Department – Stamp Duty and Registration Charges for land purchase for solar power projects to be refunded Challenge 1: REC vs concessional/promotional benefits and more The most important feature of the AP Solar Power Policy, however, is that …

It’s Time for India to Get Serious about Solar

Source: environmentalleader.com Six hundred million people without power – and those were the ones expecting to have power. I’m not going to join the chorus of critical voices reacting to two of the world’s largest power black-outs recently in India. While surely there is ample blame to go around, it’s not really clear what happened. It could have been the lack of infrastructure investment, the light monsoon weather causing farmers to use more electricity for pumping irrigation water or states taking more than their allotted share of electricity from the grid. But one thing is clear, this power outage ground India’s economy to a halt, left 10 percent of the world’s population without power and rolled through 22 of India’s 28 states. And that’s not counting the 300 million people there who have no regular access to electricity. The electricity crisis will certainly bring India’s energy problem into the forefront so this a great time to rethink and recommit to solar being a larger part of the energy mix. Although the …

1,000 MW of Solar Milestone Passed in India

Source: cleantechnica A hearty congratulations is in order for India. It has just surpassed the 1,000 MW mark for installed photovoltaic solar power. Were there celebrations? It seems at times we don’t acknowledge the achievements in renewable energy that are taking place. Rather, the general perception seems to be one of attempting to fill up an enormous hole. (David Brower was reputed to have told fellow activists to allow themselves some enjoyment on their journeys, or else they would suffer too much.) These renewable energy achievements are taking place amidst economic struggles around the world, and one might imagine, given the overall gloom, they are not being recognized enough. Most of the solar capacity is in Gujarat, and there is also an additional 85 MW of off-grid PV solar. Gujarat Solar Park currently has scores of solar installations totaling about 600 MW, and it is planned to soon expand that capacity to about 1,000 MW. The largest individual solar park there is Charanka, with about 200 MW, which is expected to grow to 500. Gujarat might have 10,000 …

A Concept Water Pipe For Generating Cheap Electricity

Source: fastcoexist As we wrote a few weeks ago, engineers have recently come up with ways of generating electricity from the pressure in the water distribution system. The video below is a concept for something similar–though on a smaller scale: a pipe that uses the rush of water to generate electricity to power lightbulbs. The idea comes from Ryan Jongwoo Choi, a South Korean design student studying at London’s Central Saint Martins school. He says the concept is designed for communities without access to electricity, but with running water. The device is fitted into a standard pipe, and the lightbulbs, which store small amounts of energy, slotted into the top. “Many people just unnecessarily leave their water tap open in their daily lives and this is such a serious waste of resources,” Choi says. “So I was focused on changing that wasted water into another type of energy source. If we apply this product to the existing pipe lines or to new ones which will be produced, it will be a very valuable energy source …

Tide turns towards undersea energy

Source: Edition.cnn (CNN) – A 30-meter- turbine anchored to the seafloor off the Scottish coast is proving that tidal farms are a turn closer to being a viable renewable energy source. Scottish Power completed preliminary trials of the giant undersea turbine in the fast-flowing coastal waters off the Orkney Islands. It found that the turbine produced one megawatt of electricity, enough to power 500 homes and businesses. “We’re very pleased with the initial results and we’ve operated at full power already,” says Alan Mortimer, head of innovation at Scottish Power Renewables. If the next stage of testing goes according to plan, Mortimer says that work will soon begin on a fleet of the turbines — manufactured by Andritz Hydro Hammerfest — and will be installed at another site in the Sound of Islay off the west coast of Scotland. Although there are examples of similar stand-alone operations in Norway and the UK, the Sound of Islay turbines would be the first large group of its kind anywhere in the world. When …

Pilgrim centres go green by tapping solar energy

Source: Thehindu India’s pilgrim centres attract visitors from across the globe all year round. These centres, with large community kitchens, cater to the visiting devotees with a variety of food. And now, they have gone green too, using solar energy rather than the traditional methods. The Saibaba Ashram at Shirdi in Maharashtra commissioned its solar cooking system in 2009. The kitchen complex of the Ashram has 73 parabolic dishes to capture the sun’s rays to run what is touted as the world’s largest solar cooking system. It cooks food for 50,000 devotees everyday. The system taps the sun’s rays to generate 3,600 kg of steam daily and saves nearly 1,00,000 kg of cooking gas annually. It costs Rs.1.3 crores. Of this, the Central government’s Non-Renewable Energy Ministry provided Rs.58 lakh as subsidy. Steam cooking is clean, efficient and hygienic, especially when food is cooked on a massive scale. The dish antennas concentrate solar rays on a giant reflector which transfers the heat to generate steam with temperature ranging between 550 …

Cost-effective solar power module could also serve as an eco-friendly furnace

Source: Gizmag Borrowing technology from sophisticated telescope mirrors as well as high-efficiency solar cells used for space exploration, a group of students and researchers at the University of Arizona is putting the final touches on a novel power plant that promises to generate renewable energy twice as efficiently as standard solar panel technology with highly competitive costs and a very small environmental impact. Curved mirrors in solar power plants usually concentrate the sun’s rays along a water pipe, heating the water into steam that is then fed to power-generating turbines. But rather than distributing the power over the area of a water pipe, researchers at the University of Arizona are working on focusing as much as possible of the sun’s captured energy onto a precise point in space. The target is a small glass ball that is only five inches in diameter. The ball contains a specially coated lens that redirects the light to an array of 36 small, high-efficiency solar cells, which were originally developed for space applications, that …

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